ESL useful phrases: Opinion

Giving your opinion


I think that . . .
I don't think that . . .
In my opinion . . .
In my view . . .
In my reckoning . . .
I strongly believe in . . .
I definitely think that . . .
Well, if you ask me . . .
Well, I think . . .
I'd say...
Personally, I think...
What I reckon is...
If you ask me...
The way I see it...
As far as I'm concerned...
If you don't mind me saying...
I'm utterly convinced that...
In my humble opinion...



Not giving your opinion
I couldn't say.
I've never given it much thought.
I don't have any feelings either way.
Your guess is as good as mine.
I (really) don't know what to say.
I really can't say.
You're asking the wrong person.
It doesn't affect me (either way).
It doesn't make any difference to me.
That's an interesting question.
 Asking for support or details

Why do you think that?
Could you elaborate?
Could you give (me) an example?
Can you illustrate that?
What evidence do you have?
Could you explain it in more detail?
Could you provide some details?

Supporting your opinions

Let me illustrate,
For example,
For instance,
To give you an example,
Let me give you an example,
To elaborate,
First, (second), etc. (These phrases can be followed by details, examples, elaboration, or a summary of your main points.) Discribing: Ten Expressions to Use In Speaking And Writing I reckon... I'd say... Personally, I think... What I reckon is... If you ask me... The way I see it... As far as I'm concerned... If you don't mind me saying... I'm utterly convinced that... In my humble opinion... How To Use These Phrases In Your English We follow all the phrases with a sentence or clause that shows the speaker's opinion. Phrases 1 - 3 are really quite informal. You can use these phrases when you are discussing something with friends or people who you know well. In phrase 1, 'reckon' is a very common word in the UK today. It means 'I think' but British people use the word 'reckon' much more often than 'think'. Phrases 5, 6 and 7 are all quite polite and show clearly that the statement is only an opinion. Phrase 8 is more polite because it says to the other speaker that they might not agree with what you are saying. Phrase 9 shows a very strong opinion. The speaker has no doubt at all that it is true. Phrase 10 is the most polite expression of the ten. It is often written on the Internet as the abbreviatoin 'IMHO' or 'imho'. Ten Expressions to Use In Speaking And Writing In my opinion, this one would be better. To my mind this one's better. If you ask me, this one's better. To my way of thinking, this one's fine. In my view, this one is best. Know what I think? That one's best. I'd say tomorrow that one's better. What I think is that one's better. For me, that one's better. I tell you what I think, that one's best. How To Use These Phrases In Your English 'In my opinion' is the classic expression - but it's not the only one. Use moderately. 'To my mind' is a common spoken form - and you can use it in writing, too. 'If you ask me' is very, very common in spoken English, and can come first or last in a sentence. 'To my way of thinking' is often used with emphasis on 'my' to give a strong opinion. 'In my view' is common in spoken and written English. The abbreviated question '(Do you) know what I think?' is very popular and is not rude. The conditional structure I'd say is rarely taught as a conditional, but this is one of the most common ways of giving an opinion in English. 'For me' is like 2 and 5. 10 is similar to 6, and is quite direct. 

http://www.ihbristol.com/useful-english-expressions/example/giving-your-opinion/8 

http://www.btinternet.com/~ted.power/dis04.html

http://www.eslgold.com/speaking/phrases.html

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