A visit to a museum

Vocabulary

  1. exhibit
  2. exhibition
  3. docent: a voluntary worker who acts as a guide in a museum, art gallery, etc
  4. curator: a keeper or custodian of a museum or other collection
  5. artefact/artifact: an object that was made a long time ago and is historically important, for example a tool or weapon
  6. gallery: a room or building for the display or sale of works of art
  7. display case : a case, made all or partly of glass, for displaying items in a shop or museum for observation or inspection
  8. permanent and temporary exhibits
  9. donation, purchase, or on loan
  10. antique
  11. Archaeologist: a scientist who seeks to understand past human cultures by careful study of the artifacts and other evidence from archaeological sites.
  12. Archaeology: a method for studying past human cultures based on material evidence (artifacts and sites).
  13. Artifact: any object made, modified, or used by humans; usually this term refers to a portable item.
  14. Culture: the set of learned beliefs, values, styles, and behaviors generally shared by members of a society or group.
  15. History: the study of past events and cultures using written records, oral traditions, and archaeological evidence as sources of information.
  16. Prehistory: the period of human experience prior to written records; in the Americas, prehistory refers to the period before Europeans and their writing systems arrived, covering at least 12,000 years.
  17. Site: a place where human activities occurred and material evidence of these activities was left.
  18. Sculpture
  19. Painting
  20. Arms and Armour
  21. Ceramics
  22. Furnitur
  23. Jewellery
  24. Textile
  25. Costume
  26. Consist of
  27. Are represented
  28. Painted vases
  29. Gobelins
  30. Span
  31. Canvases
  32. Eminent
  33. Tapestry
  34. Weapons
  35. Pottery
  36. Porcelain
  37. I’d like = I would like
  38. Consist of
  39. Are represented
  40. Painted vases
  41. Coach
  42. Gobelins
  43. Span
  44. Canvases
  45. Eminent
  46. Tapestry
  47. In conclusion I’d like to stress that
Questions
A visit to a museum.
• Why do some children think museums are boring?
• What can be done to make museums more interesting?
• Why is it important to learn about the past?
• Who do you think should really own important historical objects?

Story

Rules for visitors of the Museum of Antropology and Ethnography (Kunstkamera) (extract)

  • The entrance to the Museum for individual visitors is by tickets perchased at the ticket office of the Museum.
  • The tickets to the Museum are valid for 30 minutes after purchasing.
  • The purchase of tickets at the Museum ticket office by any person more than once during a day is forbidden.
  • Overcoats, bags, are to be left at the cloakrooms.
  • Photo and video are allowed by special tickets.
  • At the exposition “First natural sciences collections of Kunstkamera” photo and video are strictly prohibited.

In order to save the unique anatomy collections it is forbidden:

  • to guide excursions without an authorized license;
  • to use mobile phones;
  • to touch artifacts, to spoil and tear off labels, exhibition texts, information stands and arrows;
  • to smoke at the Museum building;
  • to bring beverages.


Video

Your Museum Visit






Topics

History of the First Russian Museum

In autumn 1714, Peter the Great gave an order to doctor Robert Areskin to move his personal collections and library from Moscow to the new capital and begin work on the creation of the first state public museum – the Kunstkamera. The collections, consisting of “fish, reptiles and insects in bottles”, mathematical, physics and chemistry instruments, and also books from the Tsar’s library, were put in Peter’s Summer Palace.

For Peter the Great, it was extremely important to create an image of a changing Russia. The emperor had the habit of receiving ambassadors in his museum, and a tour of the museum was part of the visit programme for all important guests.

The first public exhibition of the Kunstkamera was opened in 1719 in the “Kikin chambers” – the confiscated home of the disgraced boyar A. Kikin. At this time, it was also decided to build a special building. Peter chose the location for the Kunstkamera himself in the centre of the capital.

In December 1726, collections began to be brought to the new building of the museum. According to a report from the newspaper “Sankt-Peterburgskie vedemosti” on 26 November 1728, “yesterday the imperial library with the kunst and natural camera were opened after they were brought to the new academic chambers”. The working days of the library and kunstkamera were reported, and also the fact that entry to them was free. Peter believed that “enthusiasts should be taught and entertained, instead of taking money from them.”

After the division of the Kunstkamera in the 1830s into a number of independent museums and the creation of the Ethnographical and Anatomical Museums, and later (in 1878) the Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography, its main exhibitions were dedicated to the culture and traditions of the peoples of the world. For many decades, an important part of our museum was also the memorial Cabinet of Emperor Peter I.

With the addition of the Museum wing to the Kunstkamera building in the 1870s-80s, the area of the permanent exhibits significantly increased. In 1891, new exhibitions were opened, which represented collections on the traditional culture of peoples of the world, following the geographical principle (Russia, Asia, Africa, Australia and America). Along with the “ethnographic” department, such exhibitions as the “anthropological department” and the “department of prehistoric Stone age artefacts” were created. After the creation of the Ethnographic department of the Russian Museum (now the Russian ethnographic museum) at the beginning of the 20th century, the ethnography of peoples of distant countries and continents has been traditionally displayed at our museum.

The formation of the ethnographic funds of the museum in the second half of the 18th-early 19th century is connected with the names of leading Russian scholars and travellers: G.I. Langsdorf, Yu.F. Lisyansky, F.P. Litke, P.S. Pallas and others. In the 19th-20th century the museum received collections from I.G. Voznesenskii, N.N. Miklukho-Maklay, V.V. Junker, V.K. Arsen’ev, N.S. Gumilev and many others. Furthermore, the collection also acquired items from renowned European travellers such as J. Cook, I.F. Van Overmeer-Fissher, L. Frobenius and others.

The last museum I enjoyed with my daughter had the most interesting benches in each room. Each was different, and they were works of art in themselves. So there is more than even the art in the gallery to enjoy!

Hermitage

I'd like to tell you about the Hermitage Gallery, one of the largest and well known museums in the world. Two months ago together with my classmates I was on an exersion in S. Petersburg. I visited many places of interest including the Hermitage Gallery.I was greatly impressed by visiting this museum of art. It was founded in 1764 by Ecatherine the Second when she bought 225 pictures in Berlin . Now the Hermitage consists of five buildings.

Now I'd like to tell you about pictures, sculptures and other works of art I've seen in the Hermitage Gallery. A great number of wonderful pictures are offered there. Everyone can find some kind of pictures to enjoy, for example the pictures by the world's greatest masters: Michelangelo, Raphael, Rembrands, Rubens and many others. All great schools of paintings are represented there:Italian, Spanish, German etc.

A few words about sculptures. I saw a lot of vases, staues and fountains. The most beautiful thing I have ever seen was the fauntain belonged to Alexander the Second.

Among other outstanding peices of art I saw the coach of Ecatherine the Second and beautiful gobelens. It took 60 years to made one of these gobelens.

In conclusion I'd like to stress that no one can see everything for the one visit. To enjoy the Hermitage Gallery you must visit it several times.

The State Hermitage in St Petrsburg is one of the world's most outstanding art museums. It is the largest fine arts museum in Russia.

World famour is the collection of West-European paintings covering a span of about seven hundreds years, from the 13th to the 20th centure, and comprising works by Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Titian, El |Greco. Velasquez, Murillo; outstanding paintings by Rembrandt, Va -Dyck, Rubens; a remarkable group of French 18th-centure canvases, and Impressionist and Post Impressionist paintings. The collection illustrates the art of Italy, Spain, Holland, Belgium, Germany, Austria, France, Britain, Sweden, Denmark, Finland and some other countries. The West-European Department also includes a fine collectin of European sculpture, containing works by Michelangelo, Canova, Falconet, Houdon, Rodin and many other eminent masters. The Hermitage, together with the Pushkin Fine Arts Museum in Moscow, must be ranked among the richest in the world in respect of Impressionist art.

In addition to the works of Western masters, the Hermitage has sections devoted to the arts of India, China, Ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Pre-|Columbian America, Greece and Rome, as well as a department of prehistoric art, not to mention a section devoted to Scythian art. People come to admire the collections of tapestry, precious textiles, weapons, ivories, pottery, porcelain and furniture as well.


The British Museum

The British Museum is a museum in London, founded in 1753. It contains one of the world's richest collections of antiquities and (until 1997) one of the largest libraries in the world: British Library.

The British Museum's collection of seven million objects representing the rich history of human cultures mirrors the city of London's global variety. It includes monuments of primitive and antique culture, Ancient East culture, the richest collection of engravings, pictures, ceramics, coins.


The British Museum library is now named the British national library. It was formed in 1973 from the British Museum library and other national collections. It has a copy of every book that is printed in the English language, so that there are more than six million books there. They receive nearly two thousand books and papers daily. The British Museum Library has a very big collection of printed books and manuscripts, both old and new. You can see beautifully illustrated old manuscripts which they keep in glass cases. You can also find there some of the first English books printed by Caxton. Caxton was a printer who lived in the fifteenth century. He made the first printing-press in England. In the reading-room of the British Museum many famous men have read and studied. Charles Dickens, a very popular English writer and the author of 'David Copperfield', 'Oliver Twist', 'Dombey and Son' and other books, spent a lot of time in the British Museum Library.

In no other museum can the visitor see so clearly the history of what it is to be human.

Visiting a museum.

There are a lot of historical and art museums and galleries in St.-Petersburg. I’d like to tell you about the Hermitage, one of the largest and well-known museums in the world. It was founded in 1764 by Catherine the Second when she bought 225 pictures in Berlin. Now the Hermitage consists of five buildings. Now I’d like to tell you about pictures, sculptures and other works of art I’ve seen in the Hermitage Gallery. A great number of wonderful pictures are situated there. Everyone can find some kind of pictures to enjoy, for example, the pictures by the world’s greatest masters: Michelangelo, Raphael, Rembrandts, Rubens and many others. All great schools of paintings are represented there: Italian, Spanish, and German etc.
A few words about sculptures. There are a lot of vases and statues in the Hermitage Gallery. Most of all I like antique statues, for example, statue of Aphrodite, and wonderful painted vases from ancient Greece. Among other outstanding works of art I saw the coach of Catherine the Second and beautiful gobelins. The collection of West-European paintings has the worldwide fame. It covers a span of about seven hundred years, from the 13th to the 20th centuries, and comprise works by Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Titian, Velasques, outstanding paintings by Rembrandt, Vandyke, Rubens; a remarkable group of French 18-centure canvases, and Impressionist and Post Impression paintings. My favorite hall there is devoted to works by Paul Gogen, famous French artist. Most of his bright paintings are about nature and people of Oceania. One of them, ”The woman holding a fruit”, is my favorite because of original beauty of Maori woman and image of unusual, exotic nature. The West-European collection illustrates the art of Italy, Spain, Germany, France, Britain, Holland and some other countries. The West-European Department also includes the fine collection of European sculpture containing works by Michelangelo, Falconet, Rodin and many other eminent masters. In addition to the works of Western masters, the Hermitage has sections devoted to the arts of India, China, Ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. Also visitors come to admire the collection of tapestry, weapons, pottery, porcelain and furniture.
A lot of tourists visit the Hermitage every day. In conclusion I’d like to stress that no one can see everything for one visit. To enjoy the whole Hermitage Gallery you should visit it several times.

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